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Madeline on the Seine by trivialtales Madeline on the Seine by trivialtales
"And nobody knew quite so well how to frighten Miss Clavel"

I'm in a very rare mood where I feel like doing fan art, so trying to take advantage of that. Anyway, I doodled this in a sketchbook, then painted it. It's very wavy now... But that's what computers are for! That and covering up the mistakes.

IT'S MADELINE. I've drawn her before, but this is my best picture of her, She's from some picture books that I love (by Ludwig Bemelmans), and a TV show that I also really liked when I was a kid (I even have an animation cel from it), although it did get worse when they renewed it. The best thing about the show is that it maintained the very quick looking, sketchy style of the books. I am way more drawn to that kind of art than "finished" pieces. There's more life to it, in my opinion.

Anyway, I'm sure I'll do more of this.
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:iconelectricgecko:
ElectricGecko Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016
Zut alors!  So very French!  And your style really, really works with Madeline, I must say.
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:icontrivialtales:
trivialtales Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2016  Professional General Artist
Makes sense. It was one of the heaviest influences on my own style. Thanks!
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:iconerosarts:
erosarts Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2016  Professional Traditional Artist
This is excellent.  Even though I can still tell where the ripples are.

My kid and I watched that (80's - DIC ?) Madeline series together on DVD.  It was quite enjoyable, but yes, it got worse in the second season.
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:icontrivialtales:
trivialtales Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016  Professional General Artist
I need to see if I can "heal" those ripples out of here. It's been a long time since I've painted on paper that was not meant for it.

Anyway, yeah, I like that they used the show to do new stories, but they seemed to get kind of preschool-kids-cartoon-learn-a-lesson later on (generally). Also was not a fan of the digital coloring they started doing to the backgrounds later on. It was pretty noticeable.
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:iconerosarts:
erosarts Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016  Professional Traditional Artist
You've probably been unfortunate enough to have me type this at you before, but if you apply the laws of economics and technology to art, you are forced to realize that what computers have done for art is MAKE IT CHEAPER.  In every way.  Once you have the technology, you no longer need to buy the expensive supplies, be they paints or nibs or papers or brushes, and you no longer need to pay for the top talent, because competent use of software creates a new (easier to achieve) base level for what is acceptable.

So what you've said supports my notion in two ways: #1, the digital methods were chosen because it saved costs on time and supplies.  #2, the digital methods required less artistry to achieve.  It makes for a less fulfilling experience all around in my book.

My own personal philosophy goes further than this, aligning with the digital anarchists who believe you cannot own the rights to a string of 1's and 0's, and thus you have created public domain content if it only exists digitally (and there's really no 'original'), so there's no point in making it in the first place, but obviously, the world hasn't completely caught on to that level of sophistication (or piracy?) yet.  Our desire to further open up the Chinese Marketplace will eventually force us to accept this, because there's no way you can fine a billion bootleggers.  The future will be uglier.
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:icontrivialtales:
trivialtales Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2016  Professional General Artist
I've seen the rant before, yeah. I agree with some of what you're saying about ease of use, not so much about the lack of ownership. Or maybe I do. This probably calls for a journal entry, and a lot more thought devoted to it.
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:iconerosarts:
erosarts Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2016  Professional Traditional Artist
Putting thought into things is not what people do best.  Obviously our best plan is to just develop technology and consequences be damned!
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:iconbakertoons:
bakertoons Featured By Owner Edited Dec 4, 2016  Professional Filmographer
Ooh, this looks very nice! I know what you mean about the sketchy art vs. "clean" look.

There was also a 1952 "Madeline" cartoon thru UPA as well. Any thoughts on that? You can watch it at www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHuQlc…
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:icontrivialtales:
trivialtales Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2016  Professional General Artist
Oh yeah, I've seen that one. I like it a lot, and it definitely looks more like the books than the later cartoon (which still looks great, but is definitely designed with the mindset of being a series). I believe Ludwig Bemelmans actually worked on this one, and I've heard they did a few more in the 50's, although I've never been able to find them.
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